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Physics

It always bothers me that, according to the laws as we understand them today, it takes a computing machine an infinite number of logical operations to figure out what goes on in no matter how tiny a region of space, and no matter how tiny a region of time. How can all that be going on in that tiny space? Why should it take an infinite amount of logic to figure out what one tiny piece of space/time is going to do? So I have often made the hypotheses that ultimately physics will not require a mathematical statement, that in the end the machinery will be revealed, and the laws will turn out to be simple, like the chequer board with all its apparent complexities[4, p 57]..

Richard Ferynman goes on to warn that one should not take such prejudices too seriously. But his intuition suggested to him that the universe may not have any infinite continuous structures even though such structures pervade our existing physical models.

I consider it quite possible that physics cannot be based on the field concept, i. e., on continuous structures. In that case nothing remains of my entire castle in the air gravitation theory included, [and of] the rest of modern physics[8].

Einstein reached this conclusion near the end of his life in spite of the obvious pain it caused him because of its implications for his beloved relativity.

If the all that exists are finite conscious gestalts then physics at its core must be finite. There are many reasons for thinking that this may be true and others besides Einstein that have suggested this[5] [10]. I give additional reasons to suspect this may be true and speculate about the possible structure of such models and the experiments that might lead to such a theory in What is and what will be[1].


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