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Synchronicity



Jung's idea of Synchronicity 

as an acausal connecting principle  somewhat misses the mark. Meaning is created out of the causal, chaotic events of life. For example, human love 

comes in part from the evolutionary advantage of parents caring for their offspring. It evolved from a seemingly mechanistic processes and yet it is one of the most profoundly meaningful experiences in all our lives. One might say that the causal relationships that give rise to these feelings are one dimension or connecting principle and the experience itself is another dimension or connecting principle. I think they are one in the same. That is what I mean by: existence consciousness. There are not connections related to meaning and connections related to cause there is only experience in its structured wholeness  .

Jung misses the mark more than a little when he sees Synchronicity in extra sensory perception  experiments like those of Rhine  [23]. Carefully controlled experiments of this nature always seem to yield negative results. Of course human intuition is capable of remarkable achievements but literally transcending time and space 

to gain knowledge of distant events that could not have been gained in any other way is not among the capabilities of intuition or any other part of the human mind and psyche. The unity of matter and psyche or unus mundus  that Jung saw parapsychology  as evidence for is simpler and more direct than he thought.

Marie-Louise von Franz  writes beautifully of myth and fairy tales. Unfortunately mathematics in contrast to fairy tales has a definite and unique interpretation. To write of mathematics as one does of myth is to violate the nature of mathematics. Number and Time is not a good book.




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